#Opinion: Fight your own roots

Thank you, Red Hat. If I needed one more proof for your state of mind, you have delivered it to me.

The Advantage of Enterprise Linux over Community Projects

I totally get, why Red Hat is sending out such an email: They want to convice their potential customers of buying their Enterprise Linux. I actually second that – they need to pay their bills.

But this tone?

First of all: Linux IS a community effort. Even Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is in great parts developed by a community inside and outside Red Hat. Linux on its own is community-driven, has always been and will always be.

Second: They are completely right in regard to TCO. The TCO is not defined by the list price, but by reaction times, quality of reactions, quality of support, etc. Absolutely right. But: That does not imply the usage of an Enterprise Linux. What is this, anyway? A vendor-locked version of Linux?

Third: What do I actually need an Enterprise Linux for, anyway, if I consider a cloud stack? Back in the days, when we were running our workloads directly on Linux, one needed something special, I get that. A linux with the ability to run for years, with awesome patching mechanisms avoiding downtimes.

But those times are gone, specificially for Container Workloads. They are running on top – or, to be more precisly, operated by – Kubernetes. And Kubernetes is not tied to one only machine, it works on a pool of resources. One can easily remove a worker node (or even a master node) from a running cluster, without affecting the workloads too much. This basically eliminates the need for an Enterprise Linux with awesome uptimes, a Linux (without Enterprise) would be good enough. Because Enterprise simply doesn’t matter anymore – your resource pool is breathing anyhow, all the time. Any modern community Linux would work just fine here!

There is no need for an Enterprise Linux anymore!

So, there you have it. This email is an evidence of fear. But is not your fear, although they want to scare you. It is Red Hats fear, it is Microsoft’s fear, it is the fear of those, who understand their Linux or their OS as the basis of everything. Truth is: Linux and any other OS are just commodity. They don’t weight as much anymore as they did back then.

And, if you think further about it, the same message is true for your (Vendor Locked) Kubernetes-stack. And for your (Vendor Locked) Cloud Foundry-stack. And for your (Vendor Locked) OpenStack-stack. What do you need them for? They basically offer the same functionality as the community version (give or take some special features who appear to just a very small minority), but they only run on Red Hats Linux, with Red Hats Storage, etc. – which typically is called Vendor Lock!

Featurewise, in regards to functionality, with respect to patching and fixing, the community versions are on the same level as their Enterprise cousins. But they don’t lock you in, and with the right software stack (read: VanillaStack), they even come with the last things that set those Enterprise Stacks apart from basic community projects: Commercial Support (with up to 24/7 availability) and easy-to-use integration. Which directly impacts the TCO – towards being more reasonable and affordable than compared to those of Red Hat products, for example.

Vendor lock always makes you pay more.

Then again: What exactly do you need your Enterprise Linux for? What would you attend such a webinar for? What exactly is your benefit, besides the nice swag you get?

Think of that.

A symbol of freedom

To me, things as the channel tunnel are signs of freedom and peace. We should never forget how the world looked like 75 years ago.

Having this in mind, I enjoy doing business as a German in each European county, regardless of being a member of EU or not. And especially I enjoy doing business and meeting awesome people in the UK, where I’ll stay until sunday.

#europe #peace #business #ceo #cloud #cloudnative #cloudexcellence

Go and vote!

In September 1939, World War II began, causing a minimum of 60mio casualties. Just six years before that, in January 1933, the last free elections were held in Germany – allowing the Nazis to take over and to start their match towards total war.

European Flag, picture taken from https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Europe

When there is one thing to take away from that, it is to do the right thing: Go, and cast your vote at the European Elections this Sunday.

There is no sense in remaining at home or in trying to utilize the internet for any kind of outrage or hoping something will change without standing up for it: That will not change anything, because that does not matter in the end, that’s just noise.

Just go and vote, since the moment of truth is at the elections and if you want to convince people of your opinion, reach out to them and talk to them. One by one.

Vote on Sunday!

Must Read: Targeted Advertising Is Ruining the Internet and Breaking the World

Lately, I have announced in my German Blog to quit using Facebook and Instagram. I have switched from Android to iOS. And my Company will be switching to iOS and Macs as well.

Reason for that is Googles and Facebooks ongoing hunt for personal information, ignorance of Privacy and their business model to serve you targeted ads. Its not them alone, though! I for myself decided not to help them in doing so and I just found a wonderful article which summarizes the problem way better then I would be able to.

So, I urge you to head over to https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/xwjden/targeted-advertising-is-ruining-the-internet-and-breaking-the-world.

Read that article. Understand the message. Understand the consequences. And act. Even the smallest change in your behaviour, the decision to buy a pricey (or an used) iPhone next time or to install an Ad-blocking tool could change the world a little bit.

Read. Understand. Act.

Kauflust (V): iPhone Xs Max

I regularly change my telephones, usually around September, latest in October, I switch to an iPhone, since the new models for the upcoming season are presented in that time frame. But this time, things are a little different. And this has little to do with size and features and much with one other aspect many people tend to ignore.

Continue reading →

Dear Clara (*), …

I am not a Technician-at-your-Disposal

(Deutsche Version dieses Beitrags)

…I am not a Technician-at-your-Disposal, even though I am perhaps sharing quite a lot of information, perhaps may have quite a lot of knowledge in regards to things you are interested in and we perhaps met at some time in the past, had a conversation or two or even battled with each other in a ballroom competition.

So, whenever you ask me something in some social network, there is no world in which you would have the right to expect an answer from me within minutes or even days. I WILL answer your question, but at a point of time, when it fits into my life as well.

Additionally, although it might look differently, I am not following social networks very closely. I am looking into them not more often than every second day, I have no FB-messenger or similar software installed, I actually refuse to use the default applications for such networks and I have turned off any notifications from those networks (Twitter, Facebook, etc.).

Therefore, kindly hesitate to stress me in your social network of choice not even 48 hours after your inquiry. It won’t improve my reaction time, it won’t give you a better answer, but it will guarantee you my frustration and a harsh response. So, do me a favor, Clara: Ask me, but ask me in time. Expect an answer and perhaps remind me of that answer (you deserve it), but don’t bug me or lay your stress and frustration on me, since I will answer you in exactly the same way then.

Thank you, Clara!

Truly yours,

Karsten

(*) Name changed for some obvious reason

DevOps: Just get it started!

DevOps. Just do it!

I hear this quite often:

Yeah, we want to do DevOps. We understand this is a critical thing, it is important for succeeding in our Dev- and Ops-projects. We can’t do without.

But…

…we need to get the whole picture first. We need to have a fully featured DevOps-concept. We need some infrastructure. We need top clarify with our Stakeholders.

You know what?

These are only excuses for not doing DevOps.

The best approach to DevOps is by simply starting it. Forget about that fully featured DevOps-concept to be discussed throughout all hierarchy levels of your organization. Forget about providing the perfect infrastructure. Forget about everything – just start it!

DevOps is a process and a mindset. It is an approach to collaboration, to transparency and to knowledge sharing. Yes, it always can be done better, more aligned, deeper integrated, etc.

But nonetheless: The best way to start doing DevOps is to simply start doing it.

Today.

Life at Cloudibility (IX): I will never ever hire that person!

logo_cloudibility_rgb_transparent_square_smallI said this quite often during several projects over the last years – and often directed to persons being “difficult” with regards to discussing hard, having different opinions, contradicting a Product Owner or an Architect with thoughtful arguments. This is something you will have to accept, even if it is hard to do so. And it is exhausting, it is stressful working with such people on a day-by-day basis.

But, I changed my mind.

Or, to put it differently, I am now in a position where I want to have such characters around me. Here at Cloudibility, we want persons having their own ideas and their own minds, we want them to contradict us and to proove us to be wrong.

We want to have such minds around us. Of course, they will have to stick to our rules of respect and culture, they will need to be compatible with customers and the team. But besides this: Have your own mind, contradict, improve, overtake us!

So, we are looking for the Crazy Ones:

Are you one of them?

Welcome!

Life at Cloudibility (VII): Can’t we negotiate a special price?

I do often get this question when providing our specialist’s profiles to possible customers.

Well. No. We can’t. And we won’t.

Let me explain that bold statement a little bit. There are plenty of reasons for saying so. The most important one: We have some of the best specialists here at Cloudibility.

We love our experts.

We provide our bright minds with an environment which allows them to shine – a good work-life-balance, paid educational hours, etc. We do this, since we would have liked such an environment ourselves when being employed. But it was not possible due to calculation issues. Which forced us to quit our jobs.

Therefore, we want to pay our experts reasonable salaries and want them to gain even more knowledge. We want them to stay motivated and hunt for solutions instead of billed hours. We are investing a lot into our experts, and we are very happy and proud to do so. We know, that you deserve the best expert and the best approach for your project.

But it’s still expensive, though.

Do you know how much it costs, to do without good experts? Or to simply opt for the cheaper alternative since it is … cheaper? Can you really afford the second best or a somehow okayish solution? Just for the sake of saving some bucks forehand?

Our experts are worth their money.

They are experts and bright minds, they are able to solve problems, they are able to think outside the box. They save you time and money and nerves, they bring knowledge and experience into your projects.

So, no. We won’t do special prices.

We already have the best prices in the market since we have the best experts and the brightest minds here at Cloudibility.

Period.

Five minutes late…

I am delivering a Xamarin workshop this week. Unfortunately for my sleeping habits, the location is Munich, appr. 550km away from home.

The best way to get there is by train, at least if you don’t like flying. So, my train was to depart at 4.30am. Which implied I would have to leave home at latest at 3.50am.

Well. So much for the theory.

In practice, I left home at 3.55am. Which caused me to directly head on the Autobahn towards Munich. Instead of having a somewhat relaxed trip to the Bavarian capital, I had an unrelaxing one in my car. And instead of elegantly driving with an ICE-train from Munich to Frankfurt and then back home on Friday, I’ll drive back home on Thursday and try to catch the morning train from Berlin to Frankfurt on Friday, since I don’t want do sit in my car for 10+ hours.

This makes five minutes quite important.

And that’s why I try to keep an eye on the details, though I’m the high-level guy at Cloudibility.