Photo: Vintage Trabant

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50mm F/6.3 1/1250s ISO200, Sony Alpha II with Canon FD 50mm F/1.4 vintage lens, filtered using Adobe Lightroom Classic CC

Once upon a time (some 30 years ago), you had to wait up to 18 years for such a car – usually, the East-Germans ordered one after having given birth to a child. The Trabant was the only affordable car in East-Germany and was a super robust vehicle, which still runs today to thousands.

Impressive!

The wing

This is a closeup look over the „Tante Ju“’s right wing. I like the way this looks – old and modern at the same time.

 24mm f/4 1/640s ISO3200, Canon 6d Mk I with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

24mm f/4 1/640s ISO3200, Canon 6d Mk I with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

Notice the corrugated iron, which is polished and reflects the ambient light so nicely.

This specific foto was taken in Deutsches Technikmuseum in Berlin, a place, you should always consider visiting when being in that city.

Find more information about the JU 52 in „Flugzeug Legende Ju 52“ by Helmuth Erfurth (Amazon DE) or in „Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930-1945“ by Robert Forsyth and Eddie Creek (Amazon US).

The plane

The JU-52 airplane was one of the most successful planes before the Second World War. It is often referred to as „Tante Ju“ or „Aunt Ju“.

 24mm f/4 1/640s ISO3200, Canon 6d Mk I with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

24mm f/4 1/640s ISO3200, Canon 6d Mk I with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

It was brought into duty in 1932 and was built until the early 50s. German Airline Lufthansa selected the JU-52 as its main plane in the early 30s. As a speciality, this plane’s exterior was made from corrugated iron. 

This specific foto was taken in Deutsches Technikmuseum in Berlin, a place, you should always consider visiting when being in that city.

Find more information about the JU 52 in „Flugzeug Legende Ju 52“ by Helmuth Erfurth (Amazon DE) or in „Junkers Ju 52: A History 1930-1945“ by Robert Forsyth and Eddie Creek (Amazon US).

Image Gallery: Deutsches Technikmuseum October 2017

Last week, my family and I visited the Deutsche Technikmuseum in Berlin, a very interesting place. Here you can virtually stroll through history, you can experience trains, planes, cars, ships as well as photography or jewellery.

 24mm f/4 1/2500s ISO800, Canon 6d Mk I with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

24mm f/4 1/2500s ISO800, Canon 6d Mk I with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

I uploaded many images into a gallery. Some of these pictures were already featured in my blog or my instagram account, most of them are not and perhaps won’t ever be.

You can find the gallery here.

So, happy exploring – and leave me a comment! 

Enigma

Enigma was the German encryption system during the Second World War. The German were so proud of it, the were absolutely sure it was unbreakable. 

 24mm f/4.0 1/20s ISO8000, Canon 6d with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

24mm f/4.0 1/20s ISO8000, Canon 6d with Canon EF 24-105mm IS USM L-lens

But they were plain wrong.  

The Polish had already understood, how Enigma worked and gave their knowledge to the British, which were able to build a huge machine (called „the bomb“ ) to decrypt the catched sparking claims. Later, they got hand on the Enigma itself (by rushing into sinking submarines) and therefore were able to transcript and decrypt most of the German decryption systems throughout the whole war in Bletchley Park. 

So, an Enigma was something very common (to the Germans) and something top secret at the same time. It was a perfect sample for engineering art and the way the Germans were biased with regards to their and their opponents’ abilities also at the same time. And finally, they never knew that they were hacked. That makes an Enigma a perfect symbol for German warfare at that time.

This particular picture was taken in the Technikmuseum in Berlin. A place worth a visit!

I recommend reading the book Cryptonomicon (Amazon US | Amazon DE) by Neal Stephenson if you want to understand the fundamentals and a lot of historical background with regards to Enigma, Bletchley Park and Alan Turing.