Life at Cloudibility (X): DevOps? They should do it, not us!

logo_cloudibility_rgb_transparent_square_smallThis is, what you have to take care of when trying to establish a DevOps-culture: Many, if not most, people being affected by a DevOps-approach, will agree with it. At least as long as it does not force them to change anything and as long as they can sell it to their customers or supervisors since DevOps is very popular these days and is to be implemented by them, not by themselves.

Just last week, we had such a situation: We are in a short-term project with an enterprise customer. We have been hired by the vendor doing operations for that customer in a somewhat-CloudNative-environment (they run OpenShift on BareMetal-machines).

The end-customer sees a lot of – let’s call it that way – potential in the collaboration with the ops-vendor. Or to put it in clear words: There is no transparency, no knowledge-sharing, no automation, no versioning and no proper mindset in place at the ops-vendors teams. As a result, a lot of the infrastructure is somewhat running, but not even close to the standards, the end-customers expects. Rightfully expects, in my opinion.

This was the situation when Cloudibility experts were hired to analyze and fix errors in the environment, the software, and the collaboration. We proposed an agile DevOps-based interaction- and operations-model to our customer (the ops-vendor) and discussed chances for such a model with the end-customer as well. Both parties appeared to be very in close in their expressed opinions – yes, they all want to switch to a DevOps-approach.

One week later…

One week later, one of the two companies still sticks to that opinion, the other one does not.

The ops-vendor changed his mind since we perhaps were too successful and identified as well as fixed a lot of improvement-opportunities. He simply does not see the need to change his processes (which lead to the situation we came in) and his way of executing anymore, since the fixes are actually working and the customer appears to be satisfied.

DevOps now is to be executed by his customer, he will be participating in this „a little bit“ (quote), but only „as long as it fits into our processes and does not imply ourselves to change our approach“ (another quote). Plus: „We want to keep our internal approaches a secret, the customer does not need to know about them or can even expect us to adjust to his way of interacting – he is the customer, we are <Company-Name ommitted>“ (quote). And: „Don’t forget, we are not even required to have a logging and a monitoring in place, by the terms of the contract that customer signed“ (quote).

What could possibly go wrong with such a mindset?

Frankly, we expected this behavior from this customer, but it is frustrating nonetheless since they offer a CloudNative and Enterprise-ready environment and operations-model to their customers – and simply can not deliver due to having the wrong mindset and approaches, which gets only visible once a customer signed the contract (we have seen this several times with this customer). They execute IT the old-fashioned ways, having SDM (Service Delivery Managers), steep hierarchies and ITIL-processes in place, instead of DevOps-managers, experts, and an agile operations approach.

So, be careful when someone tells you about executing DevOps. Chances are, all they want is to get their backs covered and they will refuse DevOps as soon as it would imply to change something in their own processes and approaches.

Are we stopping to help such customers and to propose modern, lightweight, cost-efficient and adoptable processes and approaches?

Never ever!

And we will – of course! – successfully end our mission in that specific project as well. But it is kind of sad to see a chance for establishing better approaches and better processes pass by just because one of the involved parties does not want to change anything on their side.

Sad from a mindset’s perspective. From a commercial perspective, it is not: We are happily there to help with the next failing project. Again.

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